10 Hangover Cures From Around the World

10 Hangover Cures From Around the World1Especially when traveling, it can be easy to over-indulge—and that can lead to an uncomfortable, or downright miserable, next day. Everybody has their own remedy of dealing with the second-day headaches and dizzies they swear by, despite how weird it might seem to others. Here are some tips from around the globe for coping when you’ve had one (or three) too many:

strong green teaStrong Green Tea

Green tea is full of anti-oxidants known to help cleanse the liver, making China’s top hangover remedy a no-brainer. But don’t overdo it since green tea is also caffeinated.


Pickle Brine

Pickle Brine

Hope you like pickles. Thanks to its concentration of sugar and vinegar, pickle brine is the hangover remedy of choice for the Polish. So drink up—if you can stomach it.



Nothing like a little hair of the dog for hangover fix? At least, that’s how our friends in Holland, the land of lagers, feel. Best served cold in a tall pint glass.


Pickled HerringPickled Herring

Hungover in Germany? Sit yourself down for a “hangover breakfast,” featuring raw pickled herring wrapped around pieces of gherkin and onion. Oh, and you’re supposed to eat that on an empty stomach.

sePickled Sheep’s Eyeballs

There’s not much to say about this, except you don’t eat them straight. Nope. Your two pickled sheep’s eyeballs are serviced in a cocktail mixed with tomato juice.


Tripe SoupTripe Soup

Tripe—that’s cow stomach, in case you didn’t know—is the ingredient of choice for Romanians who had too much to drink the night before. It’s most often served boiled in a greasy, salty soup with garlic, vinegar, cream and root veggies. This is also a popular remedy in Turkey and Mexico.


If you’re going to be hungover anywhere in the world, be hungover in Canada and treat yourself to a plate of French fries and cheese curds smothered in gravy. Yes, Canada does it right.


When in Italy, do as the Italians do: get rid of that pounding headache with a cup—or a whole pot, let’s be real—of espresso.


Leafy Birch BranchesLeafy Birch Branches

You don’t eat the birch branches in Russia. No, instead you head to a sauna to sweat out the toxins and then whip yourself with the branches to stimulate blood circulation.


Pickled PlumsPickled Plums

In Japan, treat yourself to some salty pickled plums to combat futsuka yoi, meaning “two days drunk.”


By Sarah Esterman