What to Know Before you Work Abroad

NikoNomad / iStock / thinkstock.com

NikoNomad / iStock / thinkstock.com

Do you desire to work abroad? If so, there are some pertinent details to make sure they are intact before applying and sailing away to your new lifestyle. Every country and destination has different rules and regulations as well as desired skillsets. Before you pack your bags and put in your two-week notice, these “food for thought” tips are for you to ponder before you head overseas.

Clean Record
Many people are not aware that your background check and personal record may go against you for certain countries. For example, if you’ve gotten a DUI during your college years, you may be out of luck to ever work in Australia. Most countries only allow clean record individuals to work abroad. So that “silly mistake” truly affects the future of working outside the states.

Money in the Bank
Work abroad idealists need to monitor the money in their bank account. Some countries expect to see a minimum of $5,000 in the bank, or enough funds to live 3-months without working. Why? Because countries cannot afford to import bad credit workers, which may affect their country’s businesses, such as realty and paying rent.

What Skills are Needed
Every country is in demand of a certain skill. If you have those skills, or are willing to do those trades, your odds at getting approved will improve. While on a one-year work visa, this is a good time to research jobs that are focused in your field.

You May have to do the Dirty Work
Working abroad sounds like a dream when staring at the same old computer screen every day. However, most one-year work visa holders work some crummy or late-night jobs such as waiting tables, bartending, picking fruit, serving coffee, or washing dishes. If you can’t stand to do any of these tasks, working abroad may not sound as glamorous as you’d hope. And if working in restaurants, weekend work may be required.

Work vs. Holiday
Going along the concept with getting one’s hands dirty, working abroad is still work. You person still have to show up to work on time and work shifts that are not glamorous. But you may live in the heart of a traveler’s mecca, making weekend trips to spectacular cities, which would otherwise be thousand-dollar flights from the your home city.

Your Exit Strategy
Most likely work abroad fellows will need two exit strategies: leaving the home country and the visiting country. The older one gets, the more stuck in the ways people become, so take time to think about all the inconveniences, and if you can deal with such a big life change. Moving away from home is expensive; however, if seriously passionate about living abroad, while you are overseas this is the time to network for a more skilled job in your field. But the most important exit strategy is to think about returning home. Although the course of life can change throughout the year, it is good to ponder about returning home, especially if jobless.

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